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Which distributor cap and rotor should I get?
Topic Started: Fri Aug 3, 2018 1:36 pm (147 Views)
raglits
Newbie
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Recently the car has been a bit hesitant to start and would sometimes cut out when coming to a halt, especially when warm but would restart with a bit of persuasion. On Wednesday night it cut out and just wouldn't start again until it was cold. I recovered the car last night in two stages (had to stop and let the car cool down so I could start it up again for the last 1/2 mile home).

Sounded like it wasn't getting spark when turning over so I thought I'd start by looking at the rotor and cap (pictures of the rotor attached) and they are definitely not healthy so will start by getting a new cap and rotor. What's the are best ones to buy these days? I'm still learning on this car and having fallen into the trap on the MGB of buying cheaper parts only to end up replacing them soon after I don't want to go down that road again, equally I don't want the most expensive unless it really is the only option...

Also, should there be any sort of seal on the cap? I didn't see one when I took it apart and as I have an invoice from February 2017 in the history file for a new distributor cap and rotor I'm thinking that it should have lastdt a damn sight longer than it has... The only other time I had trouble starting was one morning in June when I was on holiday on a very misty and damp morning in Cornwall so I'm suspecting it's got damp and screwed it up...

Edit, it's 2.0 auto

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Edited by raglits, Fri Aug 3, 2018 1:38 pm.
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optimusprime
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Some say Bosch others Beru .After my last episode with Bopsch parts i am now going over to Beru . Looking at your picture of the rotor arm it looks like other problems . Like the carbon contact in the D/ cap is it making 100% contact withy rotor arm ?. Or the gap from rotor arm to the d/cap is to great. Check all engine earth points remove them clean them up and grease before refitting . Do this before a new cap and rotor is fitted . Also all other parts like plugs and ht leads must be resistor less . Even a clean up of the fusees in fuse box will help in the long run.
Edited by optimusprime, Sat Aug 4, 2018 10:22 am.
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raglits
Newbie
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I'll check the earth points before putting new parts on. Fuse contact points were cleaned not long ago whilst I was troubleshooting other electrical issues when I first got the car.

I'll get the multimeter on the leads to ensure there's no resistance on them and I was planning on new spark plugs in the near future anyway as I have no idea how old the current ones are, will just get the correct ones when I get the new rotor and cap.

Sounds like its pot luck on the distributor parts though...
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Will
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Thatís incorrect info on the leads - the original Mercedes HT leads have resistance built into them by design, so they spec non-resistor plugs.
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jmatcham
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To clarify:

My 190e 2.0 petrol with KAT and KE-Jetronic ignition system has conductive copper-core HT leads between plugs-distributor and coil-distributor. The leads themselves register next to zero Ohms resistance, as you would expect for copper-core leads. However, there are terminating resistors inside some of the connection sockets that provide the necessary choking/suppression for the system - viz:

- each of the turrets of the distributor cap have built-in line resistors of approx. 1k Ohm,

- the rotor arm itself has a potted in-line resistor of approx. 1k Ohm,

- each of the metal-clad spark plug connectors has built-in resistance of, again, approx. 1k Ohm.

...each of these can be probed fairly easily with a standard multi-tester. The spark plugs themselves have specified internal resistance too, but that's another story.

For what it's worth: I've just received my eBay-purchased replacement cap and rotor arm today from an Austrian supplier named "ATP-Spareparts", and having checked all the resistances have surmised that the parts are counterfeit - and discovered small-print on the packaging telling me the parts were manufactured in the PRC (badged up as ATEC Germany) and sold as "BOSCH" spec. replacement! I couldn't identify the parts as fake from outside appearences, apart from them not carrying any clear manufacturer's logo, so the probe test was a smart way to prove a point before getting as far as fitting them and having them damage the rest of the ignition system.

...learning the hard way...my life story...
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optimusprime
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Will
Sat Aug 4, 2018 12:25 pm
Thatís incorrect info on the leads - the original Mercedes HT leads have resistance built into them by design, so they spec non-resistor plugs.
Thats what i said none resuistor ht leads and plugs . Carbon core ht leads not copper .If its built in its a none resistor lead
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raglits
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So what resistance should I have in the leads if the spark plugs are non resistor plugs?

The rotor and cap arrived in the post today but I want to check everything out before I fit them...
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jmatcham
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Raglits - my apologies if my previous post has caused confusion.

I am working through a combined ignition/inlet-manifold-leak issue in my car which has the 102.962 engine (1992 2.0 litre manual with KE-Jetronic/EZL ignition system). I've used the generic Haynes manual and a tech sheet downloaded from this forum to check through the ignition components. The Haynes manual, at least, has matching spark plug specifications for the EZL and TSZ ignition systems fitted on the 190/190E from 1983 through to 1993: Champion S9YC/CC - and these spark plugs have no internal resistance themselves. The manual gives no information on the spark plug leads or their connectors - this information I obtained from the downloaded spec. sheet specific for the EZL ignition system and which specifies a total resistance for the leads+connectors of approximately 1 kOhm.

Just to clarify that: the complete HT lead is constructed from a metal-clad spark plug connector/sleeve, a copper-core HT cable, and a distributor cap connector. Only the spark plug connector carries an appreciable resistance out of all of these sub-components of the HT lead and is approx. 1 kOhm. My leads are Beru and the resistance rating is stamped on the sleeve. These leads go with the zero-resistance rated spark plugs.

You could, I suppose, obtain carbon-core HT leads that have a total resistance of 1 kOhm instead (or, indeed, have all the necessary resistance contained in the spark plugs and none in the HT leads) - if that is what your particular system requires of the HT leads to match with the spark plugs you are using?

The EZL ignition system spec. sheet I downloaded had the code name "15-1250". I can't find a suitable link just now, but someone on here will be able to point you in the direction of the appropriate spec. sheet or on-line manuals for your system.
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